LowLightFotography

LowLightFotography

The Science Museum, London ~ 26th August 2014

Having taken delivery of my Sony A7s along with a Sony FE 24-70mm f4 ZA OSS Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* Lens the day before I had already decided on the Flight Gallery in the Science Museum, London for a first test of a camera that claims to shoot in the dark. With its dark blue painted barrel ceiling, windows low down along one side, diffused lighting coming in from both ends and an array of illuminated cabinets and spot lights throughout the display space, I though that if the camera could cope with those conditions then it can cope with anything. Tripods are not allowed in the museum so it was hand holding and I was using manual settings and I was adjusting the shutter speed and aperture and let the camera pick the ISO setting. My visit wasn't about taking photos of the exhibits but more with a view to the lighting conditions on or around the exhibits and I tried to find as many variations of  that  as I  could. I  was  shooting in Extra Fine Jpeg so the software in the camera was processing the images. I was zooming in to each photo on the  rear  LCD  live viewscreen  looking  for  grain  or Luminious Noise or the red and blue speckles associated with Colour Noise. I couln't see any at the ISO numbers used. A big plus point on the A7s is a silent shutter. You can stand in the middle of a crowd and no one knows you are taking photographs. That felt a bit weird at first because you are used to hearing a click when you press down the shutter release and you know the photo has been taken. When you hear no noise you begin to wonder if any thing has happened.

The Science Museum, London ~ 26th August 2014

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